.RU

Indigenous Sports Program - National Sporting Organisations


Indigenous Sports Program



In 2005, the Australian Sports Commission (ASC) conducted an extensive review of the structure and delivery of Indigenous services, which has created significant changes to the funding programs nationally.

In 2006, this resulted in Basketball Australia and the state and territory associations liaising with newly-established Indigenous Coordination Centres (ICCs) as part of the Indigenous Sport and Recreation Program, while continuing to work closely with the ASC’s Indigenous Sports Unit.

The Basketball Australia Indigenous Sports Program (ISP) is designed to provide the opportunity for multicultural, Torres Strait Islander and Indigenous Australians to participate in basketball.

The program contributes to the Indigenous community by providing necessary health and social outcomes. It provides opportunities for Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander people to have ownership of programs and competitions within their communities, as well as being able to connect with mainstream associations. (see Appendix 3)

There are programs delivered to 500 Indigenous schools and 450 Indigenous communities nationally. There were also 100 coaching courses and 30 officiating courses conducted in Indigenous communities across Australia during 2005.123

The inaugural National ATSI Basketball Championships will be held in 2006, providing another opportunity for all ATSI participants to be involved with basketball from all around Australia.

In 2005, Basketball Australia conducted an Indigenous Sports Program workshop comprising a representative from each state and territory association, as well as representatives from the Department of Sport and Recreation in Victoria, New South Wales and the ACT. From this workshop, Basketball Australia’s plan was compiled for implementation from 2006. Basketball Australia proposes to conduct a National Indigenous Workshop in 2006 and 2007.

2006 Indigenous Sports Program



Basketball Australia works closely with state and territory associations in the delivery of the National Indigenous Sports Program (ISP). Each state and territory association submits a project plan, with Basketball Australia providing resources, coordination and strategic direction. Specifically the national ISP objectives are to:

Basketball Australia will coordinate the national ISP and will:

Basketball Australia also uses Indigenous role models in national teams: currently Rohanee Cox (Townsville) and Michelle Musselwhite (Sydney), and Nathan Jai Wai (QLD) and Patrick Mills (ACT).

There are also a range of Indigenous Sports Program in each state and territory. Following is a focus on Basketball Northern Territory’s programs.

Northern Territory Indigenous Sporting Development Program



The focus of Basketball Northern Territory’s program is to develop sustainable basketball competitions within and between Indigenous communities. This requires education in the rules and skills of the game, as well as competition structures.

The focus of the program is identifying and skilling people within communities who will be responsible for the ongoing development of referees, players, coaches and administrators to ensure a sustainable participation in basketball. The program incorporates a number of strategies.

Providing resources to communities

Resources such as modified rules for basketball, competition administration (scoresheets, draws etc.) can be provided to communities either directly or through Indigenous Sport Development Officers. There is also a need for physical resources (playing equipment, bibs, training equipment) in many communities and community schools.

A leadership course has been very well received in a number of community schools and can be extended to the broader communities. These visits incorporate teaching basketball skills, rules and running competitions, which are vital to the creation of sustainable outcomes. To date, the course has been run in schools, with senior students being skilled to run session for the junior students. As a follow up to these courses, a number of communities have identified a need for more specific referee.

Regional clinic

Basketball Northern Territory is participating in the Katherine Regional Project, a joint initiative of the NT Department of Sport and Recreation and the Australian Sports Commission. 125This will involve a Level 1 coaching course and participating coaches will be provided with a start-up kit including equipment and training aids.

The

National Vibe 3on3 basketball and hip hop challenge



Over the past seven years, the Vibe 3on3 challenge has been run in Indigenous communities around the nation.
Vibe 3on3 is a two-day Aboriginal youth weekend festival that incorporates basketball, dancing, art, culture and health. The Challenge also welcomes non-Indigenous people to attend and participate. It aims to promote healthy lifestyles, strengthen communities and boost self-esteem and is an excellent opportunity for health services and related organisations to introduce themselves to the wider community.

The Vibe 3on3 challenge is sponsored by Rio Tinto Aboriginal Foundation, the Department of Health and Ageing through the Office of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and the Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts.

Fostering inclusion



Obviously there must be rules for any sport and for the conduct of any association or their competitions. Sometimes, these rules may act as ‘rules of exclusion’ and stop rather than encourage people from playing. Associations must be conscious of a number of factors that can impact upon getting young people involved in basketball.126

Young people from some cultural backgrounds have relatively low rates of participation in general sporting activities. This may be particularly relevant to basketball associations in areas where there are a large proportion of young people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds.127

Cost is a powerful factor in determining opportunities for participation in sport. While basketball requires relatively inexpensive equipment, it does not mean it is a cheap sport to play. Long seasons and the cost of indoor facilities are two factors that can make traditional basketball competitions relatively expensive compared to some other sports.128

Young people (and associations) from rural and remote regions can be disadvantaged because of the limited number of young people available to play, the distances they have to travel and the limited expertise available in the areas of coaching and officiating.129

A range of state associations have developed programs to engage young people from CALD communities into the sport. A sample of these follow.

South Australia New Arrivals Basketball Program



The New Arrivals Basketball Program offers basketball training and competition to new and recent arrivals to South Australia. The program aims to make participation in basketball accessible to refugees and new arrivals by providing regular training and games in a welcoming and fun environment that is centrally located and close to public transport.130

Any player interested in becoming a member of the New Arrivals Basketball Program is invited to attend a training session.

The program

welcomes people of all abilities and backgrounds and seeks to constantly challenge and support each participant to develop sporting, language and social skills.



The current program has three male teams competing in the social competition at the Wayville Sports Centre. In addition, the program provides opportunities for more experienced and skilled players to compete at higher levels, through junior/senior district clubs.131

The majority of participants are male refugees aged 13-39 who have arrived within the previous two years from a variety of countries including Nigeria, Sudan, Sierra Leone, Kenya, Russia, Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia, Philippines, Malaysia, Samoa and Iraq.132

At June 2006, well over 100 new arrival students have attended the sessions since the program began. At present there is an average of 20-30 regular male participants, but a larger number of more transient participants.133

Some members are eligible to receive a subsidy to partially cover the cost of playing; this subsidy is possible thanks to the support of the Migrant Resource Centre of SA. Members of the program that qualify for the subsidy need to have been in Australia for less than three years and be aged between 10 to 25 years.

Those players who are eligible for the subsidy pay

$4.00 per game; p

layers who don't qualify for the subsidy pay the full

$7.50 per game.

134

Uniforms are also provided to all participants in the social competition free of charge for matches, along with a basketball to use before and during the match. The team is coached and players are given equal court time wherever possible.

Basketball South Australia is also looking to expand the New Arrivals Basketball Program and provide greater opportunities to primary and high school age youth to become involved in the sport.

Key issues in delivering the program

Approximately 75%of participants use public transport to get to activities so being close to these networks is very important. Providing information about which buses to catch and from where has been an important part of the program. Matches are played in the early evening so participants use public transport to get home.

Behaviour that Basketball South Australia considers unacceptable is dealt with on the spot. In nearly all cases, problems encountered are resolved due to a careful explanation of what is expected within the Australian sporting environment. Some examples encountered to date include:

Many of the participants are not regular in their attendance of games and training sessions. This creates a set of issues of not having enough or having too many people to run sessions. With irregular attendance it is difficult to develop skills and team/game concepts within the group. However, by being flexible and not demanding that those involved attend every session, there has been a large number and variety of participants through the program.

Basketball Victoria Multicultural and Indigenous Program



Basketball Victoria received a ‘Go for your life’ Physical Activity Grant for a Multicultural Development Program. The project enabled the organisation to employ a dedicated Multicultural and Indigenous Development Officer for two years. The officer is developing and implementing a Multicultural Inclusion Plan, a Multicultural Policy, and sustainable Ethno-Specific Basketball Programs. The project will facilitate widespread organisational change, enabling Basketball Victoria to include multiculturalism in all areas of its strategic planning, policy and program delivery.135

Multicultural Young Women's Basketball League



The Centre for Multicultural and Youth Issues (CMYI), Sunshine Basketball Association and Basketball Victoria started a new basketball league which ran from January to March 2006. The Multicultural Young Women’s Basketball League is for young women between the ages of 14 and 17 and registration is free. The competition was funded by the Department of Victorian Communities and the Office of Commonwealth Games.136

3 Ball competition



3 Ball is a new outdoor half court 3 on 3 social basketball competition for youth from 12 to 18 years of age (in particular for new arrivals, refugees and migrants) held in various locations around Adelaide. 3 Ball is supported by the Multicultural Communities Council, City of Port Adelaide Enfield, Basketball SA, Office for Recreation and Sport (Be Active).

Providing a positive basketball experience



Basketball Australia and the state and territory associations are committed to the health, safety and well-being of all its members and participants and are dedicated to providing a safe environment to participate in basketball throughout Australia.

Basketball Australia CEO Scott Derwin says: “A positive experience in basketball can instill in young people the need to lead a healthy, balanced lifestyle and to show compassion, support and understanding of all people in society. Young people want a safe and supportive environment which encourages them to do their best. As with all of our customers it is the responsibility of associations to provide a welcoming environment”.137

However, harassment in sport can serve to drastically undermine the intrinsic benefits of being involved in basketball. The unfortunate reality is that basketball, like all sports, are not immune from acts of discrimination, harassment and abuse.138

Harassment, discrimination and abuse are behaviour which can manifest itself in many ways within an association, including:

Depending on the nature of the case, instances of harassment or abuse in sport can have devastating effects, not only the individuals involved but also the sporting organisation itself. Apart from exposing the club or association to potential legal liability, officials may be faced with low morale, an unpleasant environment, higher turnover of personnel and the prospect of long-term damage to the organisation’s image and reputation. These are all unnecessary harms which Basketball Australia is keen to avoid.139
2010-07-19 18:44 Читать похожую статью
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • © Помощь студентам
    Образовательные документы для студентов.