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Clarke, Roger (1939 - Walter W. Arndt, Walter W. (1916  ) (from Wikipedia)


Clarke, Roger (1939





Translations generally turned up surprises. [Iain] Sproat had been approached by Roger Clarke, a civil servant who had worked for him at the Department of Trade from 1980 to 1983. He had done a prose translation of Onegin: might they be interested? Clarke’s brilliant work simply had to be accepted. It has been published in one volume with James Falen’s verse translation.

[From http://www.heraldscotland.com/sport/spl/aberdeen/pushkin-for-the-people-a-labour-of-love-has-ensured-the-complete-works-of-the-russian-master-are-available-in-english-1.99035]

Clough, S.D.P.



Cornford, Frances (cf. Salaman) (1886

1960)



Adapted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Frances Crofts Cornford (née Darwin; March 30, 1886 - August 19, 1960) was an English poet. She should not be confused with her husband Francis Cornford.

She was the daughter of the botanist Francis Darwin and Ellen Crofts, born into the Darwin — Wedgwood family. She was a granddaughter of the British naturalist Charles Darwin. Her elder half-brother was the golf writer Bernard Darwin. She was raised in Cambridge, among a dense social network of aunts, uncles, and cousins, and was educated privately (Period Piece, a memoir by Frances Cornford's first cousin and close friend, Gwen Raverat, sheds much light on Cornford’s childhood).

In 1909, Frances Darwin married Francis Cornford, a classicist and poet. They had 5 children:

Helena (b. 1913)

John (1915-1936), a poet and Communist who was killed in the Spanish Civil War.

Christopher (1917-1993), an artist and writer

Clare, who became the mother of Matthew Chapman Hugh

Frances Cornford published several books of verse, including Poems (1910), Spring Morning (1915), Autumn Midnight (1923), and Different Days (1928). Mountains and Molehills (1935) was illustrated with woodcuts by Cornford’s cousin Gwen Raverat.

She is buried at the Parish of the Ascension Burial Ground in Cambridge.

Corré, Alan D[avid].



Native of London, England.

BA Honours in Ancient and Mediaeval Hebrew (London);
MA in Semitic Languages (Manchester);
Ph.D. in Linguistics (Pennsylvania);
dissertation: The Structure of Tamil, supervised by Zellig Harris and Leigh Lisker.

Ordained rabbi by Hahám Dr. S. Gaon (London) and by Rabbis Nissim Ezran and Joseph Peretz (Jerusalem.)

M. Nita Levy, four children.

Rabbi of Spanish-Portuguese Congregation Mikveh Israel, Philadelphia 1955-63, currently emeritus professor of Hebrew Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA.

[From http://www.orbilat.com/Contributors/CV_Files/Alan_Corre.html]

E-mail: corre@uwm.edu

Deacon, Olga (née Johnson) (1876

1960)



Deutsch, Babette (1895

1982) (from Wikipedia)



Babette Deutsch

(22 September 1895 – 13 November 1982) was an American poet, critic, translator, and novelist.

Born in New York City, the daughter of Michael and Melanie (Fisher) Deutsch, she matriculated from the Ethical Culture School and Barnard College, graduating in 1917 with a B.A. She published poems in magazines such as the North American Review and the New Republic while she was still a student at Barnard.

In 1946, she received an honorary D. Litt. from Columbia University. On April 29, 1921, Deutsch married Avrahm Yarmolinsky, chief of the Slavonic Division of The New York Public Library (1918-1955), also a writer and translator. They had two sons, Adam Yarmolinsky and Michael.

Poetic Collections



Other Works



As Anthologist



Elton, Oliver (1861

1945) (cf. Briggs) (from Wikipedia)



Oliver Elton (3 June 1861  4 June 1945) was an English literary scholar whose works include A Survey of English Literature (17301880) in six volumes, criticism, biography, and translations from several languages including Icelandic and Russian. He was King Alfred Professor of English at Liverpool University.

Early life



Born at Holt, Norfolk, on 3 June, 1861, Elton was the only child of Sarah and the Reverend Charles Allen Elton (1820-1887), the headmaster of Gresham’s School, where Oliver was taught by his father until he proceeded to Marlborough College and Corpus Christi College, Oxford, where he was a scholar from 1880 to 1885. He graduated BA with first class honours in Literae Humaniores in 1884.[1]

His friends at Oxford included Leonard Huxley, Michael Sadler and Dugald Sutherland MacColl, whose sister he later married.

Career



Elton’s first work was as a tutor and lecturer in London, while preparing school editions of Shakespeare and Milton. He translated Einar Hafliðason’s Laurentius Saga as The Life of Laurence Bishop of Hólar in Iceland (Lárentíus Kálfsson) into English. In this he was encouraged by Frederick York Powell, whose biography Elton would later publish in 1906.

In 1890 he went as a lecturer to Manchester University, remaining for ten years. During his time there he published a translation of nine of the books of the Gesta Danorum by Saxo Grammaticus, a study of Michael Drayton, and The Augustan Ages (1899) which brought him recognition from the academic literary world. Meanwhile he got to know Charles Edward Montague and wrote for the Manchester Guardian.[2]

He went to Liverpool in 1901 as Professor of English Literature and stayed till his retirement in 1925. While there, he completed two thirds (four volumes) of his Survey of English Literature and lectured and wrote on Milton, Tennyson, Henry James, Chekhov and others.

After retirement he went as a visiting professor to Harvard and then settled in Oxford. He completed the Survey of English Literature, and published a book on English poetry: The English Muse: a Sketch (1933). He also continued an interest in Russian and other Slavic literature (namely Serbian) which had begun during the first world war, and published further translations, notably of Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin (1937).

Elton’s encyclopedic range is impressive and George Sampson, in the Cambridge History of English Literature, brackets him with two of his contemporaries who were also “scholars on the heroic scale of learning” : William Paton Ker and George Saintsbury.

Family



In 1888 Elton married Letitia Maynard MacColl, the sister of his Oxford friend Dugald Sutherland MacColl. Letitia became a children's writer. They had three sons, one of whom was the biologist Charles Sutherland Elton.[2]

[See Smith, D. N., revised by Rebecca Mills, Elton, Oliver (1861–1945), literary scholar and translator, in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004)

Emmet, Olivia (cf. Makourevna)



… American translator … Olivia Emmet has chosen to use her family name because of a link with a paternal ancestor who was one of the heroes of the Early Irish Revolution and a hero of the Romantic movement. Being a grand-niece of Henry James and a wife of one of the sons of Herbert G. Wells she embodies the English literary tradition itself. [From the translation.]

Falen, James E. (from Wikipedia) (1935





James E. Falen (Professor of Russian at the University of Tennessee) published a translation of Eugene Onegin by Alexander Pushkin in 1995 which was also influenced by Nabokov’s translation, but preserved the Onegin stanzas (ISBN 0809316307). This translation is considered to be the most faithful one to Pushkin's spirit according to Russian critics and translators.

Gardner

,

Vadim

(

Вадим Даниилович Гарднер) (1880-1956)



Russian poet. A U.S. citizen, lived in Russia, in 1916 adopted Russian citizenship. From 1921 he lived in Finland. In verses (collections of Poems, 1908; From Life to Life, 1912; Under the background stars, 1929) - focus on the creation of “senior” of the Symbolists, replacing the influence of poetry and journalism, VI Ivanov, a circle which Gardner belonged poetics Acmeism.

[Translated from http://slovari.299.ru/word.php?id=12818&sl=enc]

Hapgood, Isabel F. (Isabel Florence) (1851

1928) (from Wikipedia)



Isabel Florence Hapgood (November 21, 1851 - June 26, 1928) was an U.S. writer and translator of Russian texts.

Hapgood was born in Boston, the descendant of a long-established New England family. She studied Germanic and Slavic languages, specializing in Orthodox liturgical texts. She was one of the major figures in the dialogue between Western Christianity and Orthodoxy. She traveled through Russia between 1887 and 1889, meeting Leo Tolstoy. Hapgood died in New York.

Veneration

Hapgood is honored with a feast day on the liturgical calendar of the Episcopal Church (USA) on June 26.

Own works



Translations



Harding, R.C.E.



Hobson, Mary (1926

)



Mary Hobson, 77, gained a degree in Russian in her sixties and a PhD at 74. In 1999 she won the Pushkin gold medal for translation. A mother of four, she lives in south London.

[from http://www.accessinterviews.com/interviews/detail/a-life-in-the-day-mary-hobson-translator/8775]

Dr. Mary Hobson studied music at the Royal Academy of Music, then read Russian and did post-graduate research at SSEES (School of Slavonic and East European Studies), London. She won the Griboedov Prize for her translation of Woe from Wit, and Russia’s Pushkin Gold Medal for translation. Dr. Hobson has also published three novels with Heinemann Press.

[from http://mellenpress.com/mellenpress.cfm?aid=5725&pc=10]

Hofstadter, Douglas (1945

) (see Wikipedia)



E-mail dughof@cs.indiana.edu

Hoyt, Henry M. (1914





… But not any more so than 95 year-old Harry Hoyt, a retired long-time Morristown attorney, a mere 10 days earlier when he enraptured a room full of patrons at the Oldwick home of Ira and Sandra Gash with his recently released new translation of the 19th century Russian classic, “Eugene Onegin, a Novel in Verse” by Alexander Pushkin. The book is published by Dog Ear Publishing.
Mr. Hoyt published the book when he was 93. The book is unique in several respects. First, readers will be quick to spot the complete Russian text Hoyt places on opposite pages from the translation.
Secondly, Hoyt’s translation is in verse. While other translations have been written in verse, the most famous one in English, by the novelist Vladimir Nabokov, is a prose translation.
Hoyt has taken his knowledge of Russian, along with the Nabokov translation, and created a version using the same iambic tetrameter Pushkin employed.
“I don’t have the rhymes,” Hoyt said in an interview with our editor Jim Lent. “That would have been practically impossible. But using the same meter wasn’t as difficult as you would imagine.”
Sure. But why shouldn’t we expect more from Mr. Hoyt, a former Morristown alderman? He is a Renaissance man.
As an undergraduate at Harvard, he majored in 19th century European history and literature. His study of and special interest in Russian started during World War II and he visited Russia twice during the Soviet era. He paints, as well as translates poetry, for a hobby, and participated in the design of the book’s cover.
Mr. Hoyt did not just begin his translation a few years ago. He said he has been working on it, on and off, since the 1960s as a labor of love. It is the latest endeavor by a remarkable man who also in middle age took up the gauntlet to hike the 2,178-mile length of the Appalachian Trail and who signed himself up for a winter Outward Bound wilderness survival course where self-built snow caves were the night’s accommodation and most of his patrol mates were half his age.
Mr. Hoyt, a longtime Morristown Rotarian and Paul Harris Fellow, celebrated his 95th birthday this month….
[From: http://www.recordernewspapers.com/articles/2009/10/30/chatham_courier/opinion/columns/doc4ae8bd307ba0c362290292.prt]

Henry M. Hoyt passed away on Monday, March 12, 2012, at Morristown Medical Center.

Known as Harry, Mr. Hoyt was born in West Orange, N.J., on Oct. 24, 1914, the son of Henry M. Hoyt and Alice Parker Hoyt. After the death of his father when he was five years old, his mother married Harold Robert Shurtleff, who for many years was a devoted step-father of Mr. Hoyt.

Mr. Hoyt attended St. Bernard’s School in New York City, Carteret Academy in Orange, N.J., and St. Paul’s School in Concord, N.H., from where he was graduated in 1932. Mr. Hoyt was a graduate of Harvard College, earning an A.B. in 19th-century history and literature in 1936. He was a 1940 graduate of Yale Law School.

In 1941, he and his wife, née Helen Iselin Hall, were married in Morristown. They celebrated their 70th wedding anniversary in September 2011. Their marriage produced six children, 11 grandchildren, two step-grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren and two step-great-grandchildren.

During World War II, Mr. Hoyt served in the U.S. Army in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada from 1943 to 1945. While in the army, Mr. Hoyt studied Russian, an interest that endured for many years.

After the war, Mr. Hoyt returned to New Jersey and practiced law first in Newark, and later, for more than 35 years, in Morristown.

In 1952, Mr. Hoyt was elected to the Morristown Board of Aldermen, representing the Fourth Ward. He was twice re-elected, serving a total of six years. In 1971, Mr. Hoyt was one of five elected to a charter commission that studied the town government and later recommended a change from the board of aldermen to a strong mayor-town council set-up: the form of government under which Morristown continues to operate.

In 1973, Mr. Hoyt served as Morristown’s municipal attorney and was a Trustee of the Morristown Green for 51 years. Mr. Hoyt was also the long-time company lawyer for this newspaper group, Recorder Community Newspapers.

n a family vacation in Tennessee in 1957, Mr. Hoyt walked a section of the Appalachian Trail which began a 35-year endeavor to hike the entire 2,180-mile trail. As a “section hiker” he completed the trail at age 78.

Mr. Hoyt was a member of the Morristown Rotary Club for over 50 years and was a Paul Harris Fellow.

During his retirement he spent time reading, painting, traveling and translating. He compiled and published a book of his mother’s paintings and also self-published a translation of the Russian classic, “Eugene Onegin” by Alexander Pushkin.

Mr. Hoyt’s children are Henry M. Hoyt and his wife, Elizabeth, of Springfield, Mass., Elizabeth H. Bayles of Morristown, Louis Phillips Hoyt of Portland, Ore., Frances I. Hoyt of Parsippany, Paul S. Hoyt of New Port Richey, Fla., and Alexander D. Hoyt and his wife, Anja, of Zagreb, Croatia.

A celebration in memory of his life will be held on Saturday, May 26. Memorial donations may be sent to Gift of Life, Morristown Rotary, P.J. Thurkuf, President, 45 S. Park Place #204, Morristown, N.J. 07960 or Appalachian Trail Conservancy, P.O. Box 807, Harpers Ferry, W.V. 25425.

[From The Bernardsville News, Thursday, March 5, 2012]
2010-07-19 18:44 Читать похожую статью
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