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Borough Examples - Maccreanor Lavington Architects


Borough Examples



3.34. Chief planning officers in each of the 32 boroughs and the City of London were invited to put forward a built residential or mixed-use scheme that they thought represented a good example of where residential density had been successfully optimised. At the time of finalising this report, 18 of the 33 local planning authorities had nominated a scheme or schemes. In addition, GLA officers have nominated one scheme.

3.35. These schemes are set out in Appendix 2, together with a brief overview of the number of homes, number of car parking spaces, setting, PTAL and residential density. Some of these examples are illustrated with photos. As with the built scheme examples outlined above, it should be noted that these schemes were permitted and built prior to the adoption of the current London Plan (July 2011) and the publication of the Mayor of London’s Interim Housing Design Guide (August 2010).

3.36. Furthermore, some of these schemes received planning permission on appeal and are not necessarily endorsed by councilors in the relevant borough, the Mayor of London or the consultant team. It should also be noted that it is not always clear whether the density quoted for vertically stacked mixed-use schemes takes account of the non-residential floorspace contained within the development. Even if such space were always accounted for, it is most likely that this has not been done in a consistent way.

3.37. Nevertheless, they represent an interesting collection of built schemes that professional planners working in the boroughs and the GLA consider optimise development potential – in the context of the policies, guidelines and standards that pertained at the time that they were granted planning permission. Some of these examples are also referred to in sections 4 to 9 where the consultant team considers that they help to illustrate a particular issue or issues.

Table 6: :List of Built Scheme Examples



Table 6 removed from RTF version

4.

Suburban Settings



Introduction



4.1. This section discusses the characteristics of this setting before discussing Illustrations and Built Scheme Examples in suburban areas of different public transport accessibility (PTAL 0-1, PTAL 2-3 and PTAL 4-6).

Setting characteristics



4.2. Suburban areas are defined in the London Plan as areas with predominantly lower density development such as, for example, detached and semi-detached houses, predominantly residential, small building footprints and typically buildings of two to three storeys. Based on the definitions of other settings, they are located further than 800m walking distance from District, Major, Metropolitan or International town centres, although they can include local centres.

Suburban PTAL 0-1 Illustration



Location and context



Development assumptions



Illustration 1



Uses, typology, structure and massing



Car parking



Open space and public realm





Design response



The numbers below relate to the plan below.

  1. Building lines fronting the road respect existing building lines.

  2. Back gardens next to existing back gardens wherever possible.

  3. No windows to habitable rooms in flank walls of houses to safeguard privacy of adjoining gardens, other than in houses either side of small play space (which includes windows to habitable rooms to provide natural surveillance).

  4. Some existing gardens at the end of the proposed street are exposed.

  5. Parking is perpendicular to the street to maximise front gardens and is designed to be integrated with planting and trees.

  6. Buildings within the cul-de-sac form a strongly defined public / private boundary and create a public space that still addresses the external street.

Illustration 2



Uses, typology, structure and massing



Car parking



Open space and public realm



Design response



The numbers below relate to the plan below.

  1. Building lines fronting the road respect existing building lines

  2. Back gardens back on to existing back gardens where ever possible

  3. No windows to habitable rooms in flank walls of houses to safeguard privacy of adjoining gardens

  4. Single-storey elements to safeguard privacy and daylight/sunlight of adjoining gardens and to create a sense of enclosure/overlooking for the cul-de-sac.

  5. Clear building lines help to define public and private amenity space; there is no ill-defined space

Suburban PTAL 0-1 Built Scheme Examples



BSE 1 - St Bernards



Reasons for selection



Location and context



Uses, typology, structure and massing



Car parking



Open space and public realm



Other comments




BSE 2 - Asmun’s Place, Hampstead Garden Suburb



Reasons for selection



Location and context



Uses, typology, structure and massing



Car parking



Open space and public realm




Illustration 3



Location and context



Development assumptions



Uses, typology, structure and massing



Car parking



Open space and public realm



Design response



The numbers below relate to the plan below.

1. Building lines respect existing building lines. Lower maisonettes have small front gardens and entrances from the street.

2. Maisonettes have private gardens at podium level on the quieter side of the building.

3. Entrance to second floor flats.

4. Long back gardens to the east enable new patio houses to be placed along the boundary while maintaining 21m separation distances.

5. The patio house type has windows to the front and towards the patio side but no windows to the rear. This allows dwellings to be placed in close proximity with 8m front-to-front separation distances while maintaining privacy to habitable rooms.

6. Small ‘door-step’ shared play space adjacent to pedestrian entrance from main road. Play and recreation space for older children is provided by an existing recreation ground 200m away.

7. Patio houses are organised around a shared surface mews street to keep a strong public frontage while creating an internal environment that makes efficient use of the block.

Development alternatives



A single apartment block with a higher proportion of smaller dwellings wrapping the perimeter of the site would achieve a higher density in units per hectare but would require higher buildings to achieve a similar density and would not be as suitable for family accommodation.

Suburban PTAL 2-3 Built scheme examples



BSE 3 - Accordia, Cambridge



Reasons for selection



Site and context



Uses, typology, structure and massing



Car parking



Open space and public realm



Other comments




BSE 4 - Academy Fields





Reasons for selection





Location and context



Uses, typology, structure and massing



Car parking





Open space and public realm



Other comments




BSE 5 - Walter’s Way and Segal Close



Reasons for selection



Site and context



Uses, typology, structure and massing



Car parking



Open space and public realm



Other comments



BSE6 - Queen Mary’s Place



Reasons for selection



Location and context



Uses, typology, structure and massing



Car parking



Open space and public realm



Other comments



Illustration 4



Location and context



Development assumptions



Uses, typology, structure and massing



Car parking



Open space and public realm



Design response



A masterplan approach towards comprehensive redevelopment that seeks to respect the existing character by establishing a clear network of streets and building heights hierarchy.

The numbers below relate to the plan below.

  1. Direct public route provided between main road and park, overlooked by homes.

  2. The development is structured as a series of small hybrid blocks, each combining an apartment building with rows of houses. This was found to be the most efficient layout for densities and parking given the width of the site.

  3. Play space is consolidated at the interface with the existing park.

  4. Non-residential space is located on the ground floor of buildings fronting the main road.

  5. Two-storey houses and gardens are located adjacent to existing two-storey housing to respect character, safeguard security and maintain privacy of existing neighbours. 21m separation distances between new and existing dwellings. Some limited-access courtyard spaces are provided to maintain rights of way to existing gardens.

  6. Taller five-storey dual aspect buildings are located along the northern edge of the site, to prevent overshadowing of proposed homes (special attention needed to protect these homes from railway noise).

  7. Arranging the taller buildings on the north side and having lower buildings over the rest of the site means that lower rise family houses appear to be the predominant dwelling type.

  8. Relatively narrow streets (about 16m across) help keep building heights low. Back-to-back distances are 18m to maintain privacy.

  9. All new homes to have private amenity spaces (gardens, courtyards, balconies etc).

  10. A mix of on-plot, on-street and undercroft car parking areas (with overall numbers limited because of good public transport accessibility).

Development alternatives



To achieve lower building heights of two to four storeys throughout the development while retaining the same density and mix of dwelling sizes, the following trade-offs would need to be considered:


Suburban PTAL 4-6 Built scheme example



BSE 7 - Stanmore Place



Reasons for selection



Location and context



Uses, typology, structure and massing



Car parking



Open space and public realm



Other comments



5.

Urban Settings



Introduction



5.1. This section discusses the characteristics of this setting before discussing Illustrations and Built Scheme Examples in urban areas of different public transport accessibility (PTAL 0-1, PTAL 2-3 and PTAL 4-6).

Setting characteristics



5.2. Urban areas are defined in the London Plan as areas with predominantly dense development such as, for example, terraced houses, mansion blocks, a mix of different uses, medium building footprints and typically buildings of two to four storeys, located within 800m walking distance of a District centre, or along main arterial routes.

Illustration 5



Location and context



Development assumptions



Uses, typology, structure and massing



Car parking


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